Les orgues de Paris
ORGUES DE PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt           ACCUEIL       A-Z           

Tous les facteurs d’orgues

qui travaillaient à Paris  avant la Révolution 

The organ builders of the 17th century

Crespin Carlier (1560-1640) worked until 1600 in the southern Netherlands and came to Paris in 1631. Among his pupils were Valéran De Héman (his son-in-law) and Pierre Thierry, his successor in Paris. In 1635 Carlier and Thierry worked together on the organ of St Nicolas-des-Champs. He and Jan and Matthijs Langhedul developed the basis of the French classical organ. De Héman was a dynasty of French organ builders, founded by Valéran De Héman (1584- 1641). He was a pupil and son-in-law of Crespin Carlier. He was one of the greatest French organ builders of the first half of the 17th century. Pierre Thierry, Pierre Pescheur and François Ducastel were among his pupils. Valéran’s nephews François De Héman (1608-1652), Jean De Héman (1603-1660) and Louis De Héman (1601–1644) worked together. François and Jean built a new organ at St Médard (1648) and St Merry (1650). They were associated with, among others, Pierre Désenclos (xxxx-1668). Nicolas Pescheur (??-1616) founded a dynasty of French organ builders, working in Paris during the 17th century. He probably learned his skills from (among others) Jan Langhedul and Carlier. His son Pierre (1590-1637) continued his activities in the Parisian region. He learned his skills from (among others) his father and Valéran De Héman. The organs at Aubervilliers (1630, still present) and St Etienne-du-Mont at Paris (1636) were his greatest instruments. He worked also on the organ of St-Leu-Saint-Gilles and Saint-Gervais (his voix humaine can still be heard there ). With his teacher, De Héman, he founded the classical Parisian school of organ building. His most prominent pupil was Pierre Desenclos. The first generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Pescheur (1637), Carlier (1638) and De Héman (1640).

The organ builders in the 17th and early 18th

century

Photo’s: St Médard - St Merry - St Etienne-du-Mont
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 après la Révolution après la Révolution
Les orgues de Paris

All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution

1  -   2   -    -    -    -   6

The organ builders of the 17th century

Crespin Carlier (1560-1640) worked until 1600 in the southern Netherlands and came to Paris in 1631. Among his pupils were Valéran De Héman (his son-in- law) and Pierre Thierry, his successor in Paris. In 1635 Carlier and Thierry worked together on the organ of St Nicolas-des-Champs. He and Jan and Matthijs Langhedul developed the basis of the French classical organ. De Héman was a dynasty of French organ builders, founded by Valéran De Héman (1584- 1641). He was a pupil and son-in-law of Crespin Carlier. He was one of the greatest French organ builders of the first half of the 17th century. Pierre Thierry, Pierre Pescheur and François Ducastel were among his pupils. Valéran’s nephews François De Héman (1608-1652), Jean De Héman (1603-1660) and Louis De Héman (1601–1644) worked together. François and Jean built a new organ at St Médard (1648) and St Merry (1650). They were associated with, among others, Pierre Désenclos (xxxx- 1668). Nicolas Pescheur (??-1616) founded a dynasty of French organ builders, working in Paris during the 17th century. He probably learned his skills from (among others) Jan Langhedul and Carlier. His son Pierre (1590- 1637) continued his activities in the Parisian region. He learned his skills from (among others) his father and Valéran De Héman. The organs at Aubervilliers (1630, still present) and St Etienne-du-Mont at Paris (1636) were his greatest instruments. He worked also on the organ of St-Leu-Saint-Gilles and Saint-Gervais (his voix humaine can still be heard there ). With his teacher, De Héman, he founded the classical Parisian school of organ building. His most prominent pupil was Pierre Desenclos. The first generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Pescheur (1637), Carlier (1638) and De Héman (1640).

The organ builders in the 17th and early 18th century

Photo’s: St Médard - St Merry - St Etienne-du-Mont
ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     ACCUEIL      A-Z