Les orgues de Paris
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Tous les facteurs d’orgues

qui travaillaient à Paris  avant la Révolution

The organ builders in the 18th century

1/2

The Clicquot dynasty

Robert Clicquot (1645-1719) learned his skills from his brother-in-law Etienne Enocq (who worked on the organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles), who called him to Paris to work on the organ of the chapel at Versailles, and was appointed ‘facteur d’orgues du Roy’, a post held by successive members of the family. He was associated with Alexandre Thierry, who was also the godfather of his son Louis-Alexandre. After Thierry’s death (1699) Clicquot took his place as the leading organ builder in Paris. He built with the help of Julian Tribuot, the organ in the chapel at Versailles (1711). None of his organs has survived. His son Jean Baptiste Clicquot (1678-1746) learned organ building with his father and became partner of Alexandre Thierry. Robert’s other son, Louis-Alexandre Clicquot (1684-1760) did some (maintenance) works in Paris, but the important role of the family iin Paris was played by his son François-Henri Clicquot (1732-1790). The death of Thierry (1749), Lescop (1753), L.A. Clicquot (1760), Ferrand (1763) and Bessart (1764) ended the last generation of organ builders representing the French classical organ type ‘pur sang’ and a new era began with François-Henri Clicquot by far in the lead. The realization of the great organ at St Roch (1770) established his reputation. The number of instruments he maintained and modernized quickly increased. Between 1770 and his death he overshadowed all other Parisian organ builders. The greatest instrument built by François-Henri Clicquot was that at St Sulpice (1781). His best preserved instruments in Paris are at St Gervais (1768) and St Nicolas-des-Champs (1777). His most important innovations were: modified voicing of the foudation stops and Plein jeu (more sharp)  a ‘grand jeu’ founded on the Bombardes introduction of new solo stops like the Hautbois new composition of the small keyboards (Récit, echo)   His son Claude François Clicquot (1762-1801) succeeded his father in 1790 and completed unfinished works of his father, e.g. the organ of Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois. During the first part of the Revolution he rebuilt some organs which were removed from suppressed churches, including St Eustache and St Jacques-du-Haut-Pas and he repaired many others (e.g. St Merry). In 1794, he abandoned his profession to join the army, as did his two brothers.

Other organ builders in the 18th century

Photo’s: St Roch - St Gdermain-l’Auxerrois  Signature of FH Clicquot (organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles)
après la Révolution après la Révolution
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Les orgues de Paris

All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution 

1  -    -    -    -   5   -   6

The organ builders in the 18th century

1/2

The Clicquot dynasty

Robert Clicquot (1645-1719) learned his skills from his brother-in-law Etienne Enocq (who worked on the organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles), who called him to Paris to work on the organ of the chapel at Versailles, and was appointed ‘facteur d’orgues du Roy’, a post held by successive members of the family. He was associated with Alexandre Thierry, who was also the godfather of his son Louis-Alexandre. After Thierry’s death (1699) Clicquot took his place as the leading organ builder in Paris. He built with the help of Julian Tribuot, the organ in the chapel at Versailles (1711). None of his organs has survived. His son Jean Baptiste Clicquot (1678-1746) learned organ building with his father and became partner of Alexandre Thierry. Robert’s other son, Louis-Alexandre Clicquot (1684- 1760) did some (maintenance) works in Paris, but the important role of the family iin Paris was played by his son François-Henri Clicquot (1732-1790). The death of Thierry (1749), Lescop (1753), L.A. Clicquot (1760), Ferrand (1763) and Bessart (1764) ended the last generation of organ builders representing the French classical organ type ‘pur sang’ and a new era began with François-Henri Clicquot by far in the lead. The realization of the great organ at St Roch (1770) established his reputation. The number of instruments he maintained and modernized quickly increased. Between 1770 and his death he overshadowed all other Parisian organ builders. The greatest instrument built by François-Henri Clicquot was that at St Sulpice (1781). His best preserved instruments in Paris are at St Gervais (1768) and St Nicolas-des-Champs (1777). His most important innovations were: modified voicing of the foudation stops and Plein jeu (more sharp)  a ‘grand jeu’ founded on the Bombardes introduction of new solo stops like the Hautbois new composition of the small keyboards (Récit, echo)   His son Claude François Clicquot (1762-1801) succeeded his father in 1790 and completed unfinished works of his father, e.g. the organ of Saint- Germain l'Auxerrois. During the first part of the Revolution he rebuilt some organs which were removed from suppressed churches, including St Eustache and St Jacques-du-Haut-Pas and he repaired many others (e.g. St Merry). In 1794, he abandoned his profession to join the army, as did his two brothers.

Other organ builders in the 18th century

Photo’s: St Roch - St Gdermain-l’Auxerrois  Signature of FH Clicquot (organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles)
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