Les orgues de Paris
ORGUES DE PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt           ACCUEIL       A-Z           

Autres facteurs d’orgue

du 19-20ème siècle

1-2-3

François   Delangue   (*1959)   learned   his   skills   at   the   Haerpfer- Erman   company.   He   had   his   own   company   in   Amanvillers   from 1984-1994.   He   worked   on   the   organ   of   the   Chapelle   Notre-Dame de l'hôpital du Val-de-grâce . Henry   Didier   (1861-1918)   learned   his   skills   in   the   workshop   of his   father   Charles   Didier   (1831-1881),   who   had   been   apprentice at    the    workshop    of    Merklin.    After    a    period    in    the    Caribbean region,    he    returned    to    France    in    1889    and    in    1890    he    was associated   with   Mutin   (Mutin   et   Cie)   for   a   short   period.   After   a successful    period    during    the    years    1890-1900,    his    workshop steadily    lost    quality    and    work.    His    son    François    Didier    (1894- 1939)   tried   to   recover   the   firm,   but   eventually,   he   had   to   sell   his workshop   in   1930   to   Jacquot   (Rambervillers).   He   built   the   organ of  Saint-Joseph-des-carmes (1902) Frobenius    Orgelbyggeri    was    founded    by    Theodor    Frobenius (1885–1972)   in   1909.   After   1925,   he   adopted   the   style   of   the Organ     Reform     Movement     and     neo-classical     design.     When Theodor's   sons   Walther   and   Erik   joined   the   company   in   1944, they    began    to    build    organs    in    the    classical    tradition,    with mechanical   actions   and   slider   windchests.   They   built   the   organ   of     Eglise Danoise ‘Frederikskirken’ (1955) Jean-Baptiste    Gadault     (??-1845)    and    his    son    Charles    (1828- 1883)   were   organ   builders   active   in   Paris   in   the   middle   of   the XIXth   century.   Charles   Gadault   worked   on   the   organ   of   St.   Louis des Invalides  in 1853. Michel     Giroud      (*1939)     learned     his     skills     at     the     firm     of Schwenkedel   and   founded   his   own   company   in   1976   in   Bernin. In 2000, Jacques Nonnet (*1960, pupil of Formentelli) took over. Michel   Giroud   was   part   of   the   team   which   restored   the   organ   of Notre-Dame-de-Paris    (1992)   and   he   restored   the   Suret   organ   of Sainte Élisabeth  (1999). Camille    Godefroid    worked    at    the    Cavaillé-Coll    company    as cabinet    maker    between    1876    and    1882.    He    created    his    own company   and   his   son   B.   joined.   Their   workshop   was   located   in Paris.   He   built   the   organ   of   Chapelle   des   frères   hospitaliers   de Saint-Jean-de-Dieu (1903) Philippe   Guilmard    (Paris),   organist   and   former   organ   builder. He modified the organ of St. Joseph des Epinettes . Philippe     Hartmann      (1928-2014)     learned     his     skills     at     the Gutschenritter   and   Gonzalez   firms.   He   had   his   own   company during   the   years   1958-1969.   Afterwards,   he   was   kworking   as   a voicer   at   the   firms   of   Jean   Deloye   and   Haerpfer.   He   built   the choir organ of Saint-Séverin  (1966).
Georges   Helbig   (1903-??)   was   an   organ   builder   in   the   Parisian region,   active   during   the   years   1933-1960.   He   was   for   some   time the    representative    in    Paris    of    the    Jacquot-Lavergne    firm.    He worked on the organ of Eglise Protestante Unie -Béthanie . Jean   Hermann   (1906-1965)   worked   at   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm   and was   their   last   voicer,   until   1959,   when   the   house   Pleyel   closed their   organ   department.   After   that,   he   created   his   own   firm.   He was   in   charge   of   the   maintenance   of   the   organ   of   Notre-Dame- de-Paris    in   the   fifties   of   the   XXth   centuries   and   the   works   on   this organ during the years 1959-1965. Jan   van   den   Heuvel   (Dordrecht,   Netherlands)   started   his   firm   in 1967.   In   1975,   his   brother   joined   him.   In   addition   to   the   organ building   principles   derived   from   Dutch   organ   building   traditions, both   Jan   and   Peter   were   fascinated   in   nineteenth   century   French organ   building,   culminating   in   the   construction   of   an   instrument in   Katwijk   in   1983   inspired   by   the   19th   century   French   organ building   art.      In   1985,   they   completely   rebuilt   the   famous   organ in   the   St.   Eustache   and   after   that,   they   built   several   other   large instruments   in   major   European   cities   (Geneva,   London,   Munich and in Stockholm) and New-York. Saint-Eustache (1980). Bernard   Hurvy    (*1958)   learned   his   skills   at   the   Haerpfer   and Renaud   firms,   and   created   his   own   firm   in   1991.   His   activities comprise     both     historical     and     modern     instruments     and     all traction    techniques.    He    worked    on    the    organs    of    Saint-Jean- Baptiste-de-Grenelle  and Notre-Dame-de-Val-de-Grâce . Jules    Isambart     was    a    former    employee    of    the    workshop    of Cavaillé-Coll,   who   started   his   own   firm   in   1936   with   other   former employees   of   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm,   which   closed   at   the   end   of the   fifties   of   the   XXth   century.   He   worked,   togehter   with   another former   employee   of   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm   (Jean   Perroux),   on   the organ of St. Dominique . Detlef   Kleuker    (1822-1988)   was   a   German   organ   builder.   His style   was   loosely   based   on   the   North-German   baroque   style.   The buffets   were   rather   modern   and   sharp,   while   the   stop   lists   were pretty      traditional.      In      1986,      Siegfried      Bäune      took      over management    of    the    firm,    which    was    closed    in    1992.    Eglise Protestante Allemande (1963) Dominique   Lalmand   (*1954)   worked   at   Hartmann,   Jaccard   and Quoirin   and   started   his   own   firm   in   1986.   His   activities   comprise the   restoration   and   construction   of   organs.   He   worked   on   the organ of St. Séverin . next
Les orgues de Paris

Autres facteurs d’orgue

du 19-20ème siècle

1-2-3

ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     ACCUEIL      A-Z
François    Delangue    (*1959)    learned    his    skills    at    the    Haerpfer- Erman   company.   He   had   his   own   company   in   Amanvillers   from 1984-1994.   He   worked   on   the   organ   of   the   Chapelle   Notre-Dame   de l'hôpital du Val-de-grâce . Henry   Didier   (1861-1918)   learned   his   skills   atthe   workshop   of   his father   Charles   Didier   (1831-1881),   who   had   been   apprentice   at   the workshop   of   Merklin.   After   a   period   in   the   Caribbean   region,   he returned   to   France   in   1889   and   in   1890   he   became   associated   with Mutin   (Mutin   et   Cie)   for   a   short   period.   After   a   successful   period during   the   years   1890-1900,   his   workshop   steadily   lost   quality   and work.   His   son   François   Didier   (1894-1939)   tried   to   recover   the   firm, but    eventually,    he    had    to    sell    his    workshop    in    1930    to    Jacquot (Rambervillers).    He    built    he    organ    of    Saint-Joseph-des-carmes (1902). Frobenius     Orgelbyggeri     was     founded     by     Theodor     Frobenius (1885–1972)   in   1909.   After   1925,   he   adopted   the   style   of   the   Organ Reform   Movement   and   the   neo-classical   design.   When   Theodor's sons   Walther   and   Erik   joined   the   company   in   1944,   they   began   to build   organs   in   the   classical   tradition,   with   mechanical   actions   and slider        windchests.        They        built        the        organ        of        Eglise Danoise ‘Frederikskirken’ (1955). Jean-Baptiste   Gadault    (??-1845)   and   his   son   Charles   (1828-1883) were    organ    builders    active    in    Paris    in    the    middle    of    the    XIXth century.    Charles    Gadault    worked    on    the    organ    of    St.    Louis    des Invalides  in 1853. Michel   Giroud    (*1939)   learned   his   skills   at   the   firm   of   Schwenkedel and   founded   his   own   company   in   1976   in   Bernin.   In   2000,   Jacques Nonnet (*1960, pupil of Formentelli) took over. Michel   Giroud   was   part   of   the   team   which   restored   the   organ   of Notre-Dame-de-Paris     (1992)    and    he    restored    the    Suret    organ    of Sainte Élisabeth  (1999). Camille   Godefroid   worked   at   the   Cavaillé-Coll   company   as   cabinet maker   between   1876   and   1882.   He   created   his   own   company   and his   son   B.   joined.   Their   workshop   was   located   in   Paris.   Theu   built the   organ   of   Chapelle   des   frères   hospitaliers   de   Saint-Jean-de-Dieu (1903). Philippe   Guilmard    (Paris),   organist   and   former   organ   builder.   He modified the organ of St. Joseph des Epinettes . Philippe     Hartmann      (1928-2014)     learned     his     skills     at     the Gutschenritter    and    Gonzalez    firms.    He    had    his    own    company during   the   years   1958-1969.   Afterwards,   he   was   working   as   a   voicer at   the   firms   of   Jean   Deloye   and   Haerpfer.   He   built   the   choir   organ of Saint-Séverin  (1966). Georges    Helbig    (1903-??)    was    an    organ    builder    in    the    Parisian region,   active   during   the   years   1933-1960.   He   was   for   some   time the   representative   in   Paris   of   the   Jacquot-Lavergne   firm.   He   worked on the organ of Eglise Protestante Unie -Béthanie . Jean   Hermann   (1906-1965)   worked   at   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm   and was   their   last   voicer,   until   1959,   when   the   house   Pleyel   closed   their organ   department.   After   that,   he   created   his   own   firm.   He   was   in charge   of   the   maintenance   of   the   organ   of   Notre-Dame-de-Paris    in the   fifties   of   the   XXth   century   and   the   works   on   this   organ   during the years 1959-1965. Jan   van   den   Heuvel   (Dordrecht,   Netherlands)   started   his   firm   in 1967.   In   1975,   his   brother   joined   him.   In   addition   to   the   organ building   principles   derived   from   Dutch   organ   building   traditions, both   Jan   and   Peter   were   fascinated   in   nineteenth   century   French organ   building,   culminating   in   the   construction   of   an   instrument   in Katwijk   in   1983   inspired   by   the   19th   century   French   organ   building art.      In   1985,   they   completely   rebuilt   the   famous   organ   in   the   St. Eustache   and   after   that,   they   built   several   other   large   instruments in     major     European     cities     (Geneva,     London,     Munich     and     in Stockholm) and New-York. Saint-Eustache (1980). Bernard    Hurvy     (*1958)    learned    his    skills    at    the    Haerpfer    and Renaud    firms,    and    created    his    own    firm    in    1991.    His    activities comprise   both   historical   and   modern   instruments   and   all   traction techniques.    He    worked    on    the    organs    of    Saint-Jean-Baptiste-de- Grenelle  and Notre-Dame-de-Val-de-Grâce . Jules    Isambart     was    a    former    employee    of    the    workshop    of Cavaillé-Coll,   who   started   his   own   firm   in   1936   with   other   former employees   of   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm,   which   closed   at   the   end   of   the fifties    of    the    XXth    century.    He    worked,    togehter    with    another former   employee   of   the   Cavaillé-Coll   firm   (Jean   Perroux),   on   the organ of St. Dominique . Detlef   Kleuker    (1822-1988)   was   a   German   organ   builder.   His   style was   loosely   based   on   the   North-German   baroque   style.   The   buffets were   rather   modern   and   sharp,   while   the   stop   lists   were   pretty traditional.   In   1986,   Siegfried   Bäune   took   over   management   of   the firm, which was closed in 1992. Eglise Protestante Allemande (1963) Dominique    Lalmand    (*1954)    worked    at    Hartmann,    Jaccard    and Quoirin   and   started   his   own   firm   in   1986.   His   activities   comprise the    restoration    and    construction    of    organs.    He    worked    on    the organ of St. Séverin . next